My All-Time Baseball Team

Relief Pitcher: Trevor Hoffman

https://mlb.nbcsports.com/2011/01/11/all-times-saves-leader-trevor-hoffman-announces-retirement/

1993-2010, primarily with the San Diego Padres

601 career saves (2nd most all time)

7-time All Star

2-time Rolaids Relief Man Award winner

2-time National League saves leader

Owns Major League records for most 20-save seasons (15), 30-save seasons (14), and 40-save seasons (9)

Highest strikeout rate of any reliever of all time

Inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame in 2018

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

SP: Walter Johnson

SP: Christy Matherson

SP: Warren Spahn

SP: Grover Cleveland Alexander

SP: Lefty Grove

RP: Mariano Rivera

RP: Trevor Hoffman

My All-Time Baseball Team

Relief Pitcher: Mariano Rivera

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/rivera-mariano

1995-2013 for the New York Yankees

652 career saves (most all time)

2.21 career earned run average (ERA)

13-time All Star

5-time World Series champion (closed out 4 different World Series)

1999 World Series MVP

2003 American League Championship Series MVP

5-time American League Rolaids Relief Man Award winner

3-time Delivery Man of the Year winner

3-time Major League Baseball saves leader

Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 2019 on the first ballot (first inductee ever to receive 100% of the vote)

Pitched in 1,115 regular season games, which is fourth most in MLB history, most in American League history, and most all-time by a right-handed pitcher

2.21 ERA and 1.00 WHIP (walks + hits per innings pitched) are the lowest of any pitcher in the live ball era with at least 1,000 innings pitched

8–1 win–loss record and a 0.76 WHIP in the postseason

Postseason record lowest career ERA (minimum 30 innings pitched) (0.70)

Postseason record 42 saves

Postseason record most consecutive scoreless innings pitched (3313)

Postseason record most consecutive save opportunities converted (23)

Postseason record most games pitched (96)

Almost exclusively threw a cut fastball, which hitters knew was coming, yet couldn’t do anything about

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

SP: Walter Johnson

SP: Christy Mathewson

SP: Warren Spahn

SP: Grover Cleveland Alexander

SP: Lefty Grove

RP: Mariano Rivera

My All Time Baseball Team

Starting Pitcher: Lefty Grove

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/grove-lefty

1935-1941 for the Philadelphia Athletics and Boston Red Sox

300 career victories

3.06 career earned run average (ERA), which is fifth all time among pitchers who threw at least 1,000 innings

2,266 career strikeouts

2-time World Series champion (1929,1930)

6-time All Star

American League MVP in 1931

2-time pitching Triple Crown winner (victories, ERA, strikeouts)

4-time AL victories leader

9-time AL ERA leader

7-time AL strikeout leader

.680 lifetime winning percentage is eighth all-time, yet none of the seven pitchers ahead of him won more than 236 games

Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

SP: Walter Johnson

SP: Christy Mathewson

SP: Warren Spahn

SP: Grover Cleveland Alexander

SP: Lefty Grove

My All-Time Baseball Team

Starting Pitcher: Grover Cleveland Alexander

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/alexander-grover-cleveland

1911-1930 with Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago Cubs, and St. Louis Cardinals

Nicknames, “Old Pete”

373 career victories (third most all time)

2.56 career earned run average (ERA)

2,198 career strikeouts

3-time MLB pitching triple crown winner (victories, ERA, strikeouts)

6-time National League wins leader

4-time NL ERA leader

6-time NL strikeout leader

1926 World Series champion (St. Louis Cardinals)

Inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame in 1938

Ranked number 12 on the Sporting News’ list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players

Jersey retired by the Phillies

Catcher: Yogi Berra

First Base: Lou Gehrig

Second Base: Rogers Hornsby

Shortstop: Honus Wagner

Third Base: Mike Schmidt

Left Field: Ted Williams

Center Field: Willie Mays

Right Field: Babe Ruth

Starting Pitcher: Walter Johnson

Starting Pitcher: Christy Mathewson

Starting Pitcher: Warren Spahn

Starting Pitcher: Grover Cleveland Alexander

My All-Time Baseball Team

Starting Pitcher: Warren Spahn

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/spahn-warren

1942-1965, primarily for the Boston/Milwaukee Braves

363 career victories (most by a lefthanded pitcher and sixth all time)

Career victories is most by any pitcher whose career was beyond the 1920 live ball era

3.09 career earned run average (ERA)

2,583 career strikeouts

Pitched 382 lifetime complete games

63 career shutouts is sixth most all time and most by anyone from the live ball era

World Series champion in 1957

17-time National League All-Star

8-time NL win leader

3-time NL ERA leader

4-time NL strikeout leader

Pitched 2 career no-hitters

Major league Cy Young Award winner in 1957 (given to one pitcher, not separated by American League and National League, as it is today)

Inducted into Baseball hall of Fame in 1973

Warren Spahn Award is named for best lefthanded pitcher

Named to Major League Baseball’s all-century team in 1999

Ranked number 21 in The Sporting News’ list of Baseball’s Greatest Players

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

SP: Walter Johnson

SP: Christy Mathewson

SP: Warren Spahn

My All-Time Baseball Team

Starting Pitcher: Christy Mathewson

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/mathewson-christy

1900-1916, primarily for the New York Giants

Also known as “Matty”

373 career victories

2.13 career earned run average (ERA)

2,502 career strikeouts

2-time National League pitching triple crown winner (wins, ERA, strikeouts)

4-time NL wins leader

5-time NL ERA leader

5-time NL strikeout leader

Pitched 2 no-hitters

World Series champion in 1905

Pitched 3 complete game shutouts in the 1905 World Series, allowing a mere 14 hits

Inducted into Baseball hall of Fame in 1936 as part of the inaugural class that included Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Honus Wagner, and Walter Johnson

Named to Baseball’s All-Century Team in 1999

Ranked in 1999 #7 on The Sporting News’ list of the 100 Greatest Baseball Players (highest ranked pitcher)

ESPN ranked his feats in the 1905 World Series as the greatest playoff performance of all time

Insisted on enlisting into the United States Army for World War One. In France, he was accidentally gassed during a chemical training exercise and contracted tuberculosis. He died of the illness in 1925 at the age of 45.

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

SP: Walter Johnson

SP: Christy Mathewson

My All Time Baseball Team

Starting Pitcher: Walter Johnson

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Johnson

1907-1927, all for the Washington Senators

Nicknamed “The Big Train”

417 career wins (second most all time)

2.17 career earned run average (ERA)

3,508 career strikeouts, a record that stood for 56 seasons

All time leader with 110 career shutouts

4th all time with 531 career complete games

1924 World Series champion

2-time American League MVP

6-time AL win leader

5-time AL ERA leader

12-time AL strikeout leader

Named to the Major League Baseball All Century Team in 1999

Names to Major League Baseball All Time Team

Inducted in the Baseball hall of Fame in 1936 as part of its inaugural class, along with Babe Ruth, Ty Cobb, Christy Mathewson, and Honus Wagner

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

SP: Walter Johnson

My All Time Baseball Team

Right Field: Babe Ruth

https://www.biography.com/athlete/babe-ruth

1914-1935, primarily for the New York Yankees, as well as stints with the Boston Red Sox and Boston Braves

.342 lifetime batting average

714 career home runs

2,214 career runs batted in (rbi’s)

2,873 career hits

94-46 lifetime record as a lefthanded pitcher for Red Sox, with a 2.28 earned run average (ERA)

7-time World Series champion

12-time American League home run leader

5-time American League rbi leader

2-time AL All-Star

1923 AL Most Valuable Player

1924 AL batting champion

Inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame as part of its first class in 1936

Led the game in its transition from the dead ball era to one that featured long home runs, earning him unending adulation from fans

Legendary nicknames include “The Bambino” and “The Sultan of Swat”

Ranked by the Sporting News number one on its list of “Baseball’s 100 Greatest Players”

In 1999, was named to baseball’s All Century Team

Honorable Mention: Hank Aaron, Roberto Clemente, Frank Robinson, Mel Ott, Tony Gwynn, Reggie Jackson, Al Kaline, Ichiro Suzuki, Vladimir Guerrero, Dave Winfield, Paul Waner, Tony Oliva, Kiki Cuyler, Sam Crawford, Enos Slaughter, Harry Heilmann, Sam Rice, Chuck Klein

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

RF: Babe Ruth

My All-Time Baseball Team

Center Field: Willie Mays

https://www.biography.com/athlete/willie-mays

1951-1973, primarily for the New York/San Francisco Giants

.302 career lifetime batting average

660 career home runs

1,903 career runs batted in (rbi’s)

3,282 career hits

24-time National League All-Star

1954 World Series champion

2-time NL Most Valuable Player

1951 NL Rookie of the Year

1954 NL batting champion

4-time NL home run leader

4-time NL stolen base leader

12-time Gold Glove Award winner

MLB’s all-time leader in outfield putouts (7,095)

2,842 games as an outfielder third most all time

All-Star Game records for most at bats (75), hits (23), runs scored (20), and stolen bases (six)

Shares All-Star Game records for most extra-base hits (eight), triples (three), and total bases (40)

Career 156.2 wins above replacement (WAR) ranks third all time for position players

Led NL in on base plus slugging (OPS) five times

Elected to Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979

Named to Major League Baseball’s All Century Team and All-Time Team

Honorable Mention (this position is stacked with fantastic options): Ty Cobb, Mickey Mantle, Joe DiMaggio, Tris Speaker, Duke Snider, Mike Trout, Larry Doby, Richie Ashburn, Hack Wilson, Earl Averill, Edd Roush, Kirby Puckett, Vada Pinson, Andrew McCutchen, Max Carey

C: Yogi Berra

1B: Lou Gehrig

2B: Rogers Hornsby

SS: Honus Wagner

3B: Mike Schmidt

LF: Ted Williams

CF: Willie Mays

This Day in History

April 15, 1947:

Jackie Robinson breaks color barrier.

https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/robinson-jackie

On April 15, 1947, Jackie Robinson, age 28, becomes the first African American player in Major League Baseball when he steps onto Ebbets Field in Brooklyn to compete for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Robinson broke the color barrier in a sport that had been segregated for more than 50 years. Exactly 50 years later, on April 15, 1997, Robinson’s groundbreaking career was honored and his uniform number, 42, was retired from Major League Baseball by Commissioner Bud Selig in a ceremony attended by over 50,000 fans at New York City’s Shea Stadium. Robinson’s was the first-ever number retired by all teams in the league.

Jack Roosevelt Robinson was born January 31, 1919, in Cairo, Georgia, to a family of sharecroppers. Growing up, he excelled at sports and attended the University of California at Los Angeles, where he was the first athlete to letter in four varsity sports: baseball, basketball, football and track. After financial difficulties forced Robinson to drop out of UCLA, he joined the army in 1942 and was commissioned as a second lieutenant. After protesting instances of racial discrimination during his military service, Robinson was court-martialed in 1944. Ultimately, though, he was honorably discharged.

After the army, Robinson played for a season in the Negro American League. In 1946, he spent one season with the Canadian minor league team the Montreal Royals. In 1947, Robinson was called up to the Majors and soon became a star infielder and outfielder for the Dodgers, as well as the National League’s Rookie of the Year. In 1949, the right-hander was named the National League’s Most Valuable Player and league batting champ. Robinson played on the National League All-Star team from 1949 through 1954 and led the Dodgers to six National League pennants and one World Series, in 1955. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962, his first year of eligibility.

Despite his talent and success as a player, Robinson faced tremendous racial discrimination throughout his career, from baseball fans and some fellow players. Additionally, Jim Crow laws prevented Robinson from using the same hotels and restaurants as his teammates while playing in the South.

After retiring from baseball in 1957, Robinson became a businessman and civil rights activist. He died October 24, 1972, at age 53, in Stamford, Connecticut.

Taken from: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

Create your website with WordPress.com
Get started