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This Day in History:

May 19, 1943:

FDR and Winston Churchill plot D-Day.

https://www.army.mil/d-day/history.html

On May 19, 1943, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt set a date for the cross-Channel landing that would become D-Day—May 1, 1944. That date will prove a bit premature, as bad weather becomes a factor.

Addressing a joint session of Congress, Churchill warned that the real danger at present was the “dragging-out of the war at enormous expense” because of the risk that the Allies would become “tired or bored or split”—and play into the hands of Germany and Japan. He pushed for an early and massive attack on the “underbelly of the Axis.” 

And so, to “speed” things up, the British prime minister and President Roosevelt set a date for a cross-Channel invasion of Normandy, in northern France, for May 1, 1944, regardless of the problems presented by the invasion of Italy, which was underway. It would be carried out by 29 divisions, including a Free French division, if possible.

The D-Day invasion ended up taking place on June 6, 1944. 

Taken from: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/churchill-and-fdr-plot-d-day

Invasion of Normandy [1944]: Marie-Louise Osmont Witnesses Everything!

THE CHRONICLES OF HISTORY

“Shells are exploding everywhere, and not far away, with short moments of calm; we take advantage to run… we return with hearts pounding to burrow into the trench. Each time a shell hisses by too low, I cling to the back of the cook’s helper, it makes me feel a little secure, and he turns around with a smile. The fact is that we’re all afraid.”

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D-Day: The Normandy landings through rare photographs, 1944 — Rare Historical Photos

The D-Day Invasion of Normandy on June 6, 1944, was an immense undertaking involving nearly 6,939 Allied ships, 11,590 aircraft, and 156,000 troops. The military term “D-Day” refers to the day when a combat operation is to start, and “H-hour” is the exact time the operation commences. 9 more words

D-Day: The Normandy landings through rare photographs, 1944 — Rare Historical Photos