Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness(2022)

Cinema Trace - Short Movie Reviews

Whatever your thoughts are about Marvel you have to give them credit for their worldbuilding and character development. Wanda and Dr. Strange are both very unique and gray characters which makes them fun. The actors also do a great job portraying their characters.

Marvel has never been this dark before. I’m honestly surprised it hasn’t got a higher age limit. But it’s great with darker content. Marvel has for a long time felt too childish but this feels more real and got a stronger effect.

The multiverse is a very confusing subject and it can ruin movies, but it can also make them more fun. This movie did a good job not making it too confusing while also utilizing it and creating fun fanservice.

Like the previous Doctor Strange movie, the visual effects are spectacular and breathtaking. There are some scenes which are not quite as believable but it doesn’t…

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Movie Review: Captain Fantastic

Diana Tibert

Movie Description from an Online Source

Ben Cash (Viggo Mortensen), his wife Leslie and their six children live deep in the wilderness of Washington state. Isolated from society, Ben and Leslie devote their existence to raising their kids — educating them to think critically, training them to be physically fit and athletic, guiding them in the wild without technology and demonstrating the beauty of co-existing with nature. When Leslie dies suddenly, Ben must take his sheltered offspring into the outside world for the first time.

My Impression

I didn’t know what to expect when I watched the film Captain Fantastic (2016). I’d never heard of it, and I hadn’t seen the trailer. All I knew was the snippet given on Netflix, which stated a family living off-grid reconsiders their disconnection from society after an accident.

Or something like that. Given I plan to live off-grid one day, the film piqued…

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Most Anticipated Films Of April 2022!

Jerome Reviews...

March was a long but incredibly strong month for film, giving the likes of Batman, X, Fresh, After Yang, Topside, Turning Red and many others. So now we move on to April a month that also looks like it could be really strong.

As usual I’m leaving out films I have already seen however there are two films that are quite fantastic that I do highly recommend checking out this month which are.

Tony Hawk: Until The Wheels Fall Off – April 5th (HBO and HBO Max)

We’re All Going To The World’s Fair – April 15th (Theater) and April 22nd (VOD)

With that said here’s my most anticipated for April 2022!

14. Ambulance – April 8th (Theater)

13. The Bubble – April 1st (Netflix)

12. Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Childhood – April 1st (Netflix)

11. Charlotte – April 22nd (Theater)

10. The Bad Guys – April 22nd (Theaters)

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Review: Nitram

The Joy of Movies

By John Corrado

★★★ (out of 4)

Director Justin Kurzel’s film Nitram follows in the footsteps of Paul Greengrass’s 22 July, Denis Villeneuve’s Polytechnique and Gus van Sant’s Elephant (a fictionalized take on Columbine), as a film that dramatizes a real life mass shooting.

In the case of Kurzel’s film, it dramatizes the events surrounding the Port Arthur massacre in Tasmania in 1996, which prompted Australia to completely overhaul its gun laws, and mainly serves as a slow-burn character study of the perpetrator, Martin Bryant.

Caleb Landry Jones, who won the Best Actor prize last year at Cannes for the role, delivers a chilling performance in the film as a stand-in for Bryant. The title of the film is Martin backwards, a cruel nickname that kids at school used to call him, and the only way the shooter is referred to onscreen.

Nitram is a young man struggling with…

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Drive My Car – Movie Review

Slick Dungeon's Dusty Tomes and Terrible Films

Drive My Car

Hey film fans, it’s me, Slick Dungeon. I’m back to review another Oscar nominated film. The big awards ceremony is tomorrow so I’m doing my best to get through all the movies before then. Buckle up for this one because I’m reviewing the Japanese film Drive My Car. Be warned that there will be spoilers ahead so if you care about those things make a u-turn, go back and watch the movie and then come back here.

If you do watch this movie, buy the extra large popcorn because it’s got a very long runtime of three solid hours. The movie is about Yūsuke Kafuku an acclaimed theater director and actor who is married to a screenwriter named Oto. Early in the film it’s established that Oto loves Kafuku but she has affairs with other men. Kafuku doesn’t confront her about it…

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“Cyrano”: One-Sentence Review

Quick and to the point!

TAMALE MOVIE REVIEWS

With every romantically inclined note, this adaptation of Edmond Rostand’s 1897 play is a testament to love and language, a complete rejection of the cynics—and a whole-hearted embrace of the Cyranos.

12 out of 12 Tamales

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The Movies, Films and Flix Podcast – Episode 419: Grosse Pointe Blank, Hallway Fights and Assassin Unions

Movies, Films & Flix

You can download or stream the pod on Apple Podcasts, Tune In, Podbean, or Spreaker (or wherever you listen to podcasts…..we’re almost everywhere).

If you get a chance please make sure to review, rate and share. You are awesome!

Mark and Niall discuss the 1997 cult classic comedy Grosse Pointe Blank. Directed by George Armitage, and starring John Cusack, Minnie Driver, and Dan Akroyd, the movie focuses on what happens when a hitman returns home for his high school reunion. In this episode, they talk about John Cusack, movie soundtracks, and potential assassin unions. Enjoy!

If you are a fan of the podcast, make sure to send in some random listener questions (we love random questions). We thank you for listening, and hope you enjoy the episode!

You can download the pod on Apple Podcasts, Tune In, Podbean, or Spreaker.

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2022 Academy Awards — Best Picture Nominee Power Rankings

CineFiles Movie Reviews

Earlier this week, I put out some admittedly half-hearted Oscar predictions. I have not had my ear to the ground this awards season, but I did want to address the Best Picture race once more. (Mainly, I wanted to give some credit where it was due to CODA for being this year’s awards season darling. But more on that later). I think there are more shades to uncover than my original prediction took into account.

As such, I want to briefly rank the Best Picture nominees, from least likely to most likely to win.

 

10. Don’t Look Up

Netflix and Adam McKay’s Don’t Look Up doesn’t have strong legs to stand on. Released to decidedly mixed reception from fans and critics alike, and still looking for

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The Godfather 50 Years

Reely Bernie

I wonder what the iconic American drama was before The Godfather. What was that groundbreaking hit that provoked average moviegoers to revisit it multiple times, quote it constantly, and then teach their grandchildren to do the same?

I believe my grandma would say Casablanca. Typical published movie critics would point to Citizen Kane, and optimists might cheer for It’s a Wonderful Life.

Maybe it’s the darker mafioso component that puts The Godfather on top of the universal list. There is an allure there. Somehow, even a steady moral compass can get swept up by an Italian crime family’s appeal. The Italian is in the delicious food they cook and rich respect obtained by their culture between Sicily and New York City. The family bond is upheld in the highest regard (“We don’t discuss business at the table.”) But, that crime part settles underneath in hushed conversation…

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