This Day in History

June 2, 1865:

The American Civil War ends.

In an event that is generally regarded as marking the end of the Civil War, Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith, commander of Confederate forces west of the Mississippi, signs the surrender terms offered by Union negotiators. With Smith’s surrender, the last Confederate army ceased to exist, bringing a formal end to the bloodiest four years in U.S. history.

The American Civil War began on April 12, 1861, when Confederate shore batteries under General Pierre G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina’s Charleston Harbor. During 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort, and on April 13 U.S. Major Robert Anderson, commander of the Union garrison, surrendered. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to help quell the Southern “insurrection.” Four long years later, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620,000 Union and Confederate dead.

Taken from: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/american-civil-war-ends

This Day in History

May 18, 1863:

The siege at Vicksburg commences.

https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/vicksburg-campaign

On May 18, Union General Ulysses S. Grant surrounds Vicksburg, the last Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River, in one of the most brilliant campaigns of the war.

Beginning in the winter of 1862-63, Grant made several attempts to capture Vicksburg. In March, he marched his army down the west bank of the Mississippi, while Union Admiral David Porter’s flotilla ran past the substantial batteries that protected the city. 

They met south of the city, and Grant crossed the river and entered Mississippi. He then moved north to approach Vicksburg from its more lightly defended eastern side. In May, he had to split his army to deal with a threat from Joseph Johnston’s Rebels in Jackson, the state capital that lay 40 miles east of Vicksburg. After defeating Johnston’s forces, Grant moved toward Vicksburg.

On May 16, Grant fought the Confederates under John C. Pemberton at Champion Hill and defeated them decisively. He then attacked again at the Big Black River the next day, and Pemberton fled into Vicksburg with Grant following close behind. The trap was now complete and Pemberton was stuck in Vicksburg, although his forces would hold out until July 4.

In the three weeks since Grant crossed the Mississippi in the campaign to capture Vicksburg, his men marched 180 miles and won five battles. They took nearly 100 Confederate artillery pieces and nearly 6,000 prisoners, all with relatively light losses.

Taken from: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

This Day in History

April 12, 1861:

American Civil War begins as Confederate forces fire on Fort Sumter.

https://www.nps.gov/fosu/learn/historyculture/fort_sumter.htm

he bloodiest four years in American history begin when Confederate shore batteries under General P.G.T. Beauregard open fire on Union-held Fort Sumter in South Carolina’s Charleston Harbor on April 12, 1861. During the next 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort. On April 13, U.S. Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to quell the Southern “insurrection.”

As early as 1858, the ongoing conflict between North and South over the issue of slavery had led Southern leadership to discuss a unified separation from the United States. By 1860, the majority of the slave states were publicly threatening secession if the Republicans, the anti-slavery party, won the presidency. Following Republican Abraham Lincoln’s victory over the divided Democratic Party in November 1860, South Carolina immediately initiated secession proceedings. On December 20, the South Carolina legislature passed the “Ordinance of Secession,” which declared that “the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other states, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved.” After the declaration, South Carolina set about seizing forts, arsenals, and other strategic locations within the state. Within six weeks, five more Southern states–MississippiFloridaAlabamaGeorgia and Louisiana–had followed South Carolina’s lead.

In February 1861, delegates from those states convened to establish a unified government. Jefferson Davis of Mississippi was subsequently elected the first president of the Confederate States of America. When Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated on March 4, 1861, a total of seven states (Texas had joined the pack) had seceded from the Union, and federal troops held only Fort Sumter in South Carolina, Fort Pickens off the Florida coast, and a handful of minor outposts in the South. Four years after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers dead.

Take from: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history

This Day in History

March 10, 1864:

President Lincoln signs Ulysses S. Grant’s commission to command the US Army.

https://www.history.com/news/10-things-you-may-not-know-about-ulysses-s-grant

On March 10, 1864, President Abraham Lincoln signs a brief document officially promoting then-Major General Ulysses S. Grant to the rank of lieutenant general of the U.S. Army, tasking the future president with the job of leading all Union troops against the Confederate Army.

The rank of lieutenant general had not officially been used since 1798; at that time, President John Adams assigned the post to former President George Washington, in anticipation of a possible French invasion of the United States. One of Grant’s predecessors in the Civil WarWinfield Scott, had briefly earned the rank, but the appointment was only temporary—really, use of the rank had been suspended after George Washington’s death in 1799.

READ MORE: 10 Things You May Not Know About Ulysses S. Grant

In 1862, Lincoln asked Congress to revive the rank of lieutenant general in order to distinguish between the general in charge of all Union forces and other generals of equal rank who served under him in the field. Congress also wanted to reinstate the rank of lieutenant general, but only if Lincoln gave the rank to Grant. Lincoln had other ideas.

Lincoln preferred to promote then-Commanding General Henry Halleck to lead the Union Army, which had been plagued by a string of ineffective leaders and terrible losses in battle. He was reluctant to promote Grant and risk boosting the general’s popularity; at the time Washington was abuzz with rumors that many northern senators were considering nominating Grant instead of Lincoln at the 1864 Republican National Convention. After Grant publicly dismissed the idea of running for the presidency, Lincoln submitted to Congress’ choice and agreed to give Grant the revived rank. As lieutenant general of the U.S. Army, Grant was answerable only to Lincoln. Well-respected by troops and civilians, Grant earned Lincoln’s trust and went on to force the South’s surrender in 1865.

Although Grant enjoyed a distinguished career in the military, he later wrote that he never consciously chose the life of a soldier. As a student at West Point, he never expected to graduate, let alone lead the entire U.S. Army in a desperate but ultimately successful struggle to preserve the Union.

In 1869, Grant became the 18th president of the United States.

Taken from: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/lincoln-signs-ulysses-s-grants-commission-to-command-the-u-s-army

Book Review: Voices of the Army of the Potomac — Emerging Civil War

Voices of the Army of the Potomac: Personal Reminiscences of Union Veterans By Vincent L. Burns Casemate Publishers, 2021 $37.95 hardcover Reviewed by Doug Crenshaw “Here is recorded the small talk of camp, and many incidents that are too trivial for big histories… And one can get a very fair idea of the manner of…

Book Review: Voices of the Army of the Potomac — Emerging Civil War

A Whiff of Treason? John Hay, George B. McClellan, and the Incident with Major John J. Key — Emerging Civil War

ECW welcomes guest author Alexander B. Rossino A scandalous incident occurred in Washington, D.C. soon after the end of the 1862 Maryland Campaign. In late September, Maj. John J. Key, an officer attached to the staff of general-in-chief Henry Halleck, and the brother of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan’s closest advisor, Col. Thomas M. Key,…

A Whiff of Treason? John Hay, George B. McClellan, and the Incident with Major John J. Key — Emerging Civil War

Badland (2019) Movie Review

Movie Reviews 101

Director: Justin Lee

Writer: Justin Lee (Screenplay)

Starring: Kevin Makely, Mira Sorvino, Bruce Dern, Wes Studi, Trace Adkins, Jeff Fahey, Tony Todd, James Russo

Plot: Detective Matthias Breecher is hired to track down the worst of the Confederate war criminals. As he roams the Old West seeking justice, his resolve is tested when he meets a determined pioneer woman who is far more than she seems.


Runtime: 1 Hour 57 Minutes

There may be spoilers in the rest of the review

Verdict: Very Boring

Story: Badland starts as we follow detective Mathias Breecher (Makely) who has been assigned to track down the worse criminals of the confederate war and make them meet their maker. Mathias latest assignment is Reginald Cooke (Dern) a dying man who has his daughter Sarah (Sorvino) watching over him.

Mathias decides to help Sarah before her father…

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The History Behind “Field of Lost Shoes”

Great article and a cool website for anyone who is into the American Civil War!

Belle on the Battlefield

Besides Winchester, one of the most well known Civil War battles to take place in the Shenandoah Valley – thanks to some Hollywood magic – is the battle at New Market on May 15, 1864. And the most famous aspect of the battle is the charge of the Virginia Military Institute cadets across the muddy field. The movie “Field of Lost Shoes” has sparked the imagination of moviegoers and budding historians. While the movie definitely stretches the truth in some respects, few can be unimpressed by the cinematic grandeur of that fateful charge, and the stories of the young men who tug at the heartstrings of the viewers.

However, as most historians know, it’s rarely a good idea to get their history from a movie, whose producers and writers may be more concerned with box office proceeds and ratings.

In the spring of 1864, the new commander of all Union…

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Return to Gettysburg — Paranormality Radio

Grab your fife and drum, we are marching back to Gettysburg. Well, one of us is. Ally took some time and visited Gettysburg after dark on a haunted ghost tour! These are her stories. Along with JP’s sarcasm. Find Us On email us at spookyupodcast@gmail.com follow us on twitter @spookyupodcast Find us on instagram.com/spookyupodcast About…

Return to Gettysburg — Paranormality Radio
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